“Between about 1905 and 1911 over one thousand Black Americans emigrated to western Canada, and thousands more might have come had Canada proved more welcoming. By 1908-09 there were small communities of Black homesteaders at Wildwood, Alberta and near Maidstone, Saskatchewan. Over the next two years a small settlement was established at Campsie, near Barrhead, Alberta, and larger settlements at Breton and Amber Valley, just east of Athabasca, Alberta. Not all found the prospect of homesteading in the bush attractive, and some chose to stay in cities to find work. Edmonton, in particular, attracted a significant number, and by 1910 it was reported that as many as 100 Blacks were living there.” [via]

Between about 1905 and 1911 over one thousand Black Americans emigrated to western Canada, and thousands more might have come had Canada proved more welcoming. By 1908-09 there were small communities of Black homesteaders at Wildwood, Alberta and near Maidstone, Saskatchewan. Over the next two years a small settlement was established at Campsie, near Barrhead, Alberta, and larger settlements at Breton and Amber Valley, just east of Athabasca, Alberta. Not all found the prospect of homesteading in the bush attractive, and some chose to stay in cities to find work. Edmonton, in particular, attracted a significant number, and by 1910 it was reported that as many as 100 Blacks were living there.” [via]