“GoodBooks”: the new Goodwill bookstore, Gateway Blvd. and 78th Ave, Edmonton, AB “GoodBooks”: the new Goodwill bookstore, Gateway Blvd. and 78th Ave, Edmonton, AB

“GoodBooks”: the new Goodwill bookstore, Gateway Blvd. and 78th Ave, Edmonton, AB

ajourneyroundmyskull: retrospace: 30 Covers from Poland


An old favorite.

libraryland:

A screenshot from a 2005 Russian TV adaptation of Mikhail Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita.

chemin faisant: his name is Behemoth.

(via catherinewillis)

Just got this in the subject line of an email from Barnes & Noble: “Columbus Discovered America. You’ll Discover Great Savings.”
Columbus Day will be celebrated in the US on October 12, 2010 in “celebration” of the “discovery” of the New World.
Alternately, you can celebrate the Day of Indigenous Resistance or the Indigenous People’s Day. And you can fire off an email to Barnes & Noble letting them know that they are complete dicks.
Read Eduardo Galleano’s take on Columbus Day here.

Just got this in the subject line of an email from Barnes & Noble: Columbus Discovered America. You’ll Discover Great Savings.”

Columbus Day will be celebrated in the US on October 12, 2010 in “celebration” of the “discovery” of the New World.

Alternately, you can celebrate the Day of Indigenous Resistance or the Indigenous People’s Day. And you can fire off an email to Barnes & Noble letting them know that they are complete dicks.

Read Eduardo Galleano’s take on Columbus Day here.


Indeed.

ohfuckyeahohfuckyeah:

thesocietyofthespectacle:

“In societies where modern conditions of production prevail, all of life presents itself as an immense accumulation of spectacles. Everything that was directly lived has moved away into a representation.” - Guy Debord

Does the basic right of intellectual freedom apply to inmates? How far should wardens go in restricting access to information? Are books really instigators of violent crime, just as some have targeted heavy metal as a corrupting influence on youth?

"Inmates in Connecticut prisons have access to true crime books and works of fiction that depict murder and graphic violence, with no apparent restrictions based on a reader’s criminal history, according to a review of the prison library system by The Associated Press.

"In Cold Blood," about a 1959 killing in Kansas, is available in at least two Connecticut prisons, including one where a man on trial for a similar 2007 home invasion in Cheshire had served time. Prisons spokesman Brian Garnett said talking about book policies would violate a gag order in the case…

State Sen. John Kissel, R-Enfield, whose district includes six state prisons, said he will ask that “In Cold Blood” and other true crime or graphically violent books be removed from prison libraries.

"There are so many books in the world, and I don’t think inmates need to be reading about murder, whether it’s fiction or nonfiction," he said. "One would hate to think that Mr. Hayes read this book for hours and hours and hours and thought about it for days and days and days and hatched his plan for what took place in Cheshire."

If the department does not remove the books, he said, he will introduce legislation to force them.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Connecticut said it would oppose any such ban.

"This is yet another case of politicians scapegoating expression as the cause of serious violent crime," said ACLU attorney David McGuire."

"Things Magazine has posted the Pelican Project, a visual archive of Pelican paperbacks from the 1930s to the 80s. Breathe in the stark clarity of geometric layouts, Helvetica variations, and ample white space.

The designs are definitely “from an era,” but that era was also really interesting, a time when brainy little monographs flew off the shelves at independent bookstores, when information was shared and consumed en masse via organic materials, pressed vegetation, before we turned our economy over to the pixel and set fire to the past.”

via Tomorrowland

"Tolstoy was 34 when he married 18-year-old Sofia Behrs in 1862. A famous writer by then, and master of his family’s 4,000-acre estate at Yasnaya Polyana near Moscow and the 3,000 peasants living on it, he had sown his wild oats and was ready to settle down…[Sofia] was a complex woman with an iron constitution and the soul of a poet, she bore him 13 children (five of whom died), took over the running of the estate, and worked as his agent and editor, negotiating with publishers and copying out all his works, tirelessly deciphering the scribble only she could read. It may be that we would have had none of his great novels without her…

"[This is] Sofia’s photograph of Tolstoy gravely ill in the Crimea in 1902, with Tatyana. The whole family traveled south with their entourage of doctors and nurses, but he recovered and lived for another eight years."

it’s long overdue that i gave Edmonton some credit. yay library!

This morning, the library will officially open its first Lending Machine, a vending-machine style book robot that dispenses library products at the Century Park LRT station.

The machine, which looks like the kind that stocks chips and candy, can hold up to 400 books and other media.

For now, the library plans to fill it mostly with items that appeal to the younger set: genre novels, DVDs, video games and the like.

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/life/Vending+machine+provides+library+access+riders/3566316/story.html#ixzz10NhXlSTp

"The Three Bears", Little Golden Book, 1948, illustrated by Feodor Rojankovsky.

From Rojankovsky’s “Frog went a courtin’,” 1955.

Something to do under a blanket of snow: a new Anne Frank book will be released this November.
From the Sunday Independent: “More than 6,000 letters, photographs, and documents said to be found recently in the attic of the Frank family home are being transformed into a new book, Treasures from the Attic, set to be released in November 2010.”
Read more about it here: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/128672-wn-secures-new-anne-frank-title.html

Something to do under a blanket of snow: a new Anne Frank book will be released this November.

From the Sunday Independent: “More than 6,000 letters, photographs, and documents said to be found recently in the attic of the Frank family home are being transformed into a new book, Treasures from the Attic, set to be released in November 2010.”

Read more about it here: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/128672-wn-secures-new-anne-frank-title.html