The K and P Cafe in Lethbridge, Alberta (no date)

terresauvage:

Ronny Jaques
Female Chinese-Canadian worker Agnes Wong of Whitecourt, Alberta, assembles a sten gun produced for China by the Small Arms Ltd. plant., 1944

terresauvage:

Ronny Jaques

Female Chinese-Canadian worker Agnes Wong of Whitecourt, Alberta, assembles a sten gun produced for China by the Small Arms Ltd. plant., 1944

Edmonton’s Lost Laundries: “Edmonton’s first laundries were started in the 1890s by Chinese immigrant labourers who had worked on construction of the transcontinental railway line, completed in 1885…Facing racial intolerance and socio-economic pressures, Chinese immigrants had few other choices, and so they became laundrymen…By 1914, more than 30 Chinese-operated hand laundries were in operation. Many of them were located in the Boyle Street community along 96th Street north of 102nd Avenue and in what was then a fledgling Chinatown district around 97th Street and 101A Avenue.” Read more here. Edmonton’s Lost Laundries: “Edmonton’s first laundries were started in the 1890s by Chinese immigrant labourers who had worked on construction of the transcontinental railway line, completed in 1885…Facing racial intolerance and socio-economic pressures, Chinese immigrants had few other choices, and so they became laundrymen…By 1914, more than 30 Chinese-operated hand laundries were in operation. Many of them were located in the Boyle Street community along 96th Street north of 102nd Avenue and in what was then a fledgling Chinatown district around 97th Street and 101A Avenue.” Read more here. Edmonton’s Lost Laundries: “Edmonton’s first laundries were started in the 1890s by Chinese immigrant labourers who had worked on construction of the transcontinental railway line, completed in 1885…Facing racial intolerance and socio-economic pressures, Chinese immigrants had few other choices, and so they became laundrymen…By 1914, more than 30 Chinese-operated hand laundries were in operation. Many of them were located in the Boyle Street community along 96th Street north of 102nd Avenue and in what was then a fledgling Chinatown district around 97th Street and 101A Avenue.” Read more here.

Edmonton’s Lost Laundries: “Edmonton’s first laundries were started in the 1890s by Chinese immigrant labourers who had worked on construction of the transcontinental railway line, completed in 1885…Facing racial intolerance and socio-economic pressures, Chinese immigrants had few other choices, and so they became laundrymen…By 1914, more than 30 Chinese-operated hand laundries were in operation. Many of them were located in the Boyle Street community along 96th Street north of 102nd Avenue and in what was then a fledgling Chinatown district around 97th Street and 101A Avenue.” Read more here.

Chinatown South/Boyle, Edmonton, Alberta - photos by Yumi Imai. 
“I am surprised whenever planners and others alike correct me to say that this neighbourhood is not a Chinatown, much in favour of the City’s crafted name of Quarters. Despite its empty appearance, there are Chinese businesses and residences that still remain here. It is also disheartening that there is no mention of the existing Chinatown in the Quarters vision and urban design plan…Is the Quarters project desirable because we choose to ignore its existing Chinese influence rather than work with it? I also extend these questions to include underrepresented voices like aboriginal heritage where such memories have often gone unrecognized throughout our urban landscape," Paul Giang. Read the full article about Chinatown South at Spacing Edmonton. Chinatown South/Boyle, Edmonton, Alberta - photos by Yumi Imai. 
“I am surprised whenever planners and others alike correct me to say that this neighbourhood is not a Chinatown, much in favour of the City’s crafted name of Quarters. Despite its empty appearance, there are Chinese businesses and residences that still remain here. It is also disheartening that there is no mention of the existing Chinatown in the Quarters vision and urban design plan…Is the Quarters project desirable because we choose to ignore its existing Chinese influence rather than work with it? I also extend these questions to include underrepresented voices like aboriginal heritage where such memories have often gone unrecognized throughout our urban landscape," Paul Giang. Read the full article about Chinatown South at Spacing Edmonton. Chinatown South/Boyle, Edmonton, Alberta - photos by Yumi Imai. 
“I am surprised whenever planners and others alike correct me to say that this neighbourhood is not a Chinatown, much in favour of the City’s crafted name of Quarters. Despite its empty appearance, there are Chinese businesses and residences that still remain here. It is also disheartening that there is no mention of the existing Chinatown in the Quarters vision and urban design plan…Is the Quarters project desirable because we choose to ignore its existing Chinese influence rather than work with it? I also extend these questions to include underrepresented voices like aboriginal heritage where such memories have often gone unrecognized throughout our urban landscape," Paul Giang. Read the full article about Chinatown South at Spacing Edmonton. Chinatown South/Boyle, Edmonton, Alberta - photos by Yumi Imai. 
“I am surprised whenever planners and others alike correct me to say that this neighbourhood is not a Chinatown, much in favour of the City’s crafted name of Quarters. Despite its empty appearance, there are Chinese businesses and residences that still remain here. It is also disheartening that there is no mention of the existing Chinatown in the Quarters vision and urban design plan…Is the Quarters project desirable because we choose to ignore its existing Chinese influence rather than work with it? I also extend these questions to include underrepresented voices like aboriginal heritage where such memories have often gone unrecognized throughout our urban landscape," Paul Giang. Read the full article about Chinatown South at Spacing Edmonton. Chinatown South/Boyle, Edmonton, Alberta - photos by Yumi Imai. 
“I am surprised whenever planners and others alike correct me to say that this neighbourhood is not a Chinatown, much in favour of the City’s crafted name of Quarters. Despite its empty appearance, there are Chinese businesses and residences that still remain here. It is also disheartening that there is no mention of the existing Chinatown in the Quarters vision and urban design plan…Is the Quarters project desirable because we choose to ignore its existing Chinese influence rather than work with it? I also extend these questions to include underrepresented voices like aboriginal heritage where such memories have often gone unrecognized throughout our urban landscape," Paul Giang. Read the full article about Chinatown South at Spacing Edmonton. Chinatown South/Boyle, Edmonton, Alberta - photos by Yumi Imai. 
“I am surprised whenever planners and others alike correct me to say that this neighbourhood is not a Chinatown, much in favour of the City’s crafted name of Quarters. Despite its empty appearance, there are Chinese businesses and residences that still remain here. It is also disheartening that there is no mention of the existing Chinatown in the Quarters vision and urban design plan…Is the Quarters project desirable because we choose to ignore its existing Chinese influence rather than work with it? I also extend these questions to include underrepresented voices like aboriginal heritage where such memories have often gone unrecognized throughout our urban landscape," Paul Giang. Read the full article about Chinatown South at Spacing Edmonton. Chinatown South/Boyle, Edmonton, Alberta - photos by Yumi Imai. 
“I am surprised whenever planners and others alike correct me to say that this neighbourhood is not a Chinatown, much in favour of the City’s crafted name of Quarters. Despite its empty appearance, there are Chinese businesses and residences that still remain here. It is also disheartening that there is no mention of the existing Chinatown in the Quarters vision and urban design plan…Is the Quarters project desirable because we choose to ignore its existing Chinese influence rather than work with it? I also extend these questions to include underrepresented voices like aboriginal heritage where such memories have often gone unrecognized throughout our urban landscape," Paul Giang. Read the full article about Chinatown South at Spacing Edmonton. Chinatown South/Boyle, Edmonton, Alberta - photos by Yumi Imai. 
“I am surprised whenever planners and others alike correct me to say that this neighbourhood is not a Chinatown, much in favour of the City’s crafted name of Quarters. Despite its empty appearance, there are Chinese businesses and residences that still remain here. It is also disheartening that there is no mention of the existing Chinatown in the Quarters vision and urban design plan…Is the Quarters project desirable because we choose to ignore its existing Chinese influence rather than work with it? I also extend these questions to include underrepresented voices like aboriginal heritage where such memories have often gone unrecognized throughout our urban landscape," Paul Giang. Read the full article about Chinatown South at Spacing Edmonton.

Chinatown South/Boyle, Edmonton, Alberta - photos by Yumi Imai. 

I am surprised whenever planners and others alike correct me to say that this neighbourhood is not a Chinatown, much in favour of the City’s crafted name of Quarters. Despite its empty appearance, there are Chinese businesses and residences that still remain here. It is also disheartening that there is no mention of the existing Chinatown in the Quarters vision and urban design plan…Is the Quarters project desirable because we choose to ignore its existing Chinese influence rather than work with it? I also extend these questions to include underrepresented voices like aboriginal heritage where such memories have often gone unrecognized throughout our urban landscape," Paul Giang. Read the full article about Chinatown South at Spacing Edmonton.

The K and P Cafe in Lethbridge, Alberta (no date, from the April “Chop Suey in the Prairies” exhibit at the Royal Alberta Museum).

Dotted across the Alberta landscape, Chinese restaurants were the go-to place for an inexpensive, quick meal whether it was a simple plate of fried onion rings or the more exotic ginger beef and mu shu pork. In looking back, the growth of Chinese cafés gradually laid a foundation as important cultural icons. But they never started out as cultural entities.

They were born out of necessity, a desperate need for a minority to find financial security in an era oozing racism. The original Chinese coffee shops were started as efficiently run businesses that provided a living and financial security to an otherwise marginalized ethnic population.”

The Edmonton protest march against  W5, January 26,1980.
“On September 30, 1979, the CTV television network’s W5 public affairs program aired a segment called “Campus Giveaway” which was to become the focus of political activity that would shake the Chinese community for the next two years…“Campus Giveaway” portrayed the Chinese as alien, inassimilable, insular, and competitive. As the camera panned across the faces of students of Chinese ancestry, the show charged that 100,000 foreign students had descended on Canada’s campuses, squeezing white Canadian students out of places in the professional schools.
CTV’s message was plain – the Chinese were foreigners regardless of their birthplace. Reminiscent of the chargers against early Chinese labourers, the students were accused of coming to Canada to milk the country of its wealth and resources. After using Canada’s educational facilities, these “foreigners” would flee to China and Hong Kong with professional degrees financed by the Canadian taxpayer. The Chinese were yet again pictured as transient, as exploiter, as sojourner.”

The Edmonton protest march against  W5, January 26,1980.

On September 30, 1979, the CTV television network’s W5 public affairs program aired a segment called “Campus Giveaway” which was to become the focus of political activity that would shake the Chinese community for the next two years…“Campus Giveaway” portrayed the Chinese as alien, inassimilable, insular, and competitive. As the camera panned across the faces of students of Chinese ancestry, the show charged that 100,000 foreign students had descended on Canada’s campuses, squeezing white Canadian students out of places in the professional schools.

CTV’s message was plain – the Chinese were foreigners regardless of their birthplace. Reminiscent of the chargers against early Chinese labourers, the students were accused of coming to Canada to milk the country of its wealth and resources. After using Canada’s educational facilities, these “foreigners” would flee to China and Hong Kong with professional degrees financed by the Canadian taxpayer. The Chinese were yet again pictured as transient, as exploiter, as sojourner.”