“In this Year of Reconciliation declared by Mayor Don Iveson at the final National Event of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, in this centenary year of the start of the war that killed so many so young, what could be a more appropriate gesture for our city that to erect a prominent monument – I suggest a statue in Churchill Square or in the plaza in front of City Hall – honouring a Residential School Survivor, an Olympian, Canada’s first aboriginal police officer, and a fallen war hero?  Each November we repeat the words “Lest We Forget” as we consider the Cenotaph and the Fallen it represents.  I think of the words of Justice Murray Sinclair as he opened the final day of the Edmonton TRC National Event: “Never Forget.”  What better way to mark Edmonton’s Year of Reconciliation than a monument to an inspiring survivor of the Residential Schools? An heroic survivor to remind us of the quiet heroism of all the survivors, and in memory of all the children who were taken.”

In this Year of Reconciliation declared by Mayor Don Iveson at the final National Event of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, in this centenary year of the start of the war that killed so many so young, what could be a more appropriate gesture for our city that to erect a prominent monument – I suggest a statue in Churchill Square or in the plaza in front of City Hall – honouring a Residential School Survivor, an Olympian, Canada’s first aboriginal police officer, and a fallen war hero?  Each November we repeat the words “Lest We Forget” as we consider the Cenotaph and the Fallen it represents.  I think of the words of Justice Murray Sinclair as he opened the final day of the Edmonton TRC National Event: “Never Forget.”  What better way to mark Edmonton’s Year of Reconciliation than a monument to an inspiring survivor of the Residential Schools? An heroic survivor to remind us of the quiet heroism of all the survivors, and in memory of all the children who were taken.”

jvpurcell:

Looking forward to this evening’s Kreisel Lecture with Tomson Highway, put on by the Canadian Literature Centre. #canlit #yeg

"The Canadian Literature Centre/Centre de littérature canadienne presents the 8th Annual Kreisel Lecture, "Understanding Each Other: the Essential Importance of Multilingualism Through the Prism of Cree, French, and English" by Tomson Highway. Reception and book signing to follow. All are welcome to attend this free event. No RSVP required.”

Timms Centre for the Arts, 87 Avenue 112 Street Northwest, Edmonton, Canada, Thu Mar 06 2014 at 07:30 pm.

Alex Decoteau nearing the finish line at a Christmas Day race, Edmonton, 1915

"Alexander Wuttunee Decoteau, ( 19 November 1887 – 30 October 1917), was a Cree Canadian track and field athlete who competed in the 1912 Summer Olympics. He was also the first aboriginal police officer in Canada.

Alexander was born on the Red Pheasant Indian Reserve (Saskatchewan). He attended school there and at the Battleford Industrial School. He moved to Edmonton where the CityPolice hired him as a constable in 1909. He made sergeant in 1914. During this period he won most major middle or long distance races in western Canada. In 1912 he finished sixth in the 5000 metres competition.

Alex was killed by a sniper in 1917, during the Second Battle of Passchendaele.

Many of DeCoteau’s accomplishments are included in the Edmonton Sports Hall of Fame, where he was inducted a member in 1967. Also, the Edmonton Police Museum and Archives contains may of his personal and military trophies and awards. In 1985, the Cree performed a ceremony in Edmonton “to bring his spirit home”. Honours were provided by the Red Pheasant Band, the Edmonton Police Service and the Canadian army.” [via]

photosensitive1990:

From the 2014 exhibition, Picture Change

Photographer: Larry Wong

The driver of a truck forcibly pushes through a human blockade set up by members of the Papachase First Nation on Queen Elizabeth II Highway in Edmonton, Alberta, January 16, 2013. The Idle No More protest was part of the national day of action call by Canada’s First Nations Chiefs.

This altercation sparked police chiefs from Edmonton and Calgary and the officer in charge of Alberta’s RCMP to discuss the protests with the Solicitor General of Alberta, Jonathan Denis.

Publication of this photo on the front page of the Edmonton Journal prompted the Mikisew Cree First Nation to release an open letter to the public, urging sensitivity in the face of the Idle No More movement. The letter, signed by Superintendent Bob Couture of the Wood Buffalo RCMP detachment, as well as Mikisew Cree First Nation Chief Steve Courtoreille and Acting Fire Chief Darby Allen, outlined how democratic freedom must be balanced with the need to keep people safe on area highways.

isapo-muxika-images:

Tansi piyak iskweew kininaskoomtin #creewords #stugga lol (at Bannock Burger)

Cree women, Maskwacis (Hobbema), Alberta, 1890s

Plains Cree language used to name Edmonton LRT bridges

The city of Edmonton is using Plains Cree words to name two bridges on the southeast LRT extension in honour of the aboriginal community. The bridge crossing the North Saskatchewan River from downtown to the Muttart Conservatory will be named Tawatina, meaning valley.  The bridge across Connors Road will be called Kâhasinîskâk, after a nearby creek.”

"Native youth actors performing scene from "Which Way Home". The script for this production was written collectively and performed by students of Ben Calf Robe school," Edmonton, 1986.

"Native youth actors performing scene from "Which Way Home". The script for this production was written collectively and performed by students of Ben Calf Robe school," Edmonton, 1986.

Capote from the Native Cultural Arts Museum, Grouard, Alberta
The river valley is bursting with highbush cranberries right now! Apparently they’re best and sweetest after the first frost.
"The Natives of Canada used many parts of highbush cranberry for both food and medicine. The berries are high in vitamin C and were eaten fresh or made into pemmican. The bright red fruit was also used for ink and a dye for clothing. The bark and leaves, which contain a bitter tasting chemical called viburnine, were boiled into teas and used as sedatives and pain relievers. Settlers used the berries mainly for jelly and juice, and these continue to be the main uses of the fruit today. The berries can also be used in pies, sauces, liqueurs, and wine. Each berry has a large, heart shaped seed in the centre, making it more suited for use as a processed fruit rather than fresh.” [via]

The river valley is bursting with highbush cranberries right now! Apparently they’re best and sweetest after the first frost.

"The Natives of Canada used many parts of highbush cranberry for both food and medicine. The berries are high in vitamin C and were eaten fresh or made into pemmican. The bright red fruit was also used for ink and a dye for clothing. The bark and leaves, which contain a bitter tasting chemical called viburnine, were boiled into teas and used as sedatives and pain relievers. Settlers used the berries mainly for jelly and juice, and these continue to be the main uses of the fruit today. The berries can also be used in pies, sauces, liqueurs, and wine. Each berry has a large, heart shaped seed in the centre, making it more suited for use as a processed fruit rather than fresh.” [via]

Amiskwaskahegan (Cree name for Beaver Hills House - alt spelling, Amiskwatchiwwaskahigan)
"Years before white men came to the Edmonton area the Cree Indians had named many of the natural features of the region - rivers, lakes, hills, etc.
When the Hudson’s Bay and North West Companies established Forts Edmonton and Augustus in 1795 - the Crees identified them with the nearby Beaver Hills, the most prominent land marks in the district.
Accordingly, the name Beaver Hills House was given to the Forts by the Cree Indians who lived and hunted in the region in what is now the City of Edmonton.” [image 1 via, image 2 via] Amiskwaskahegan (Cree name for Beaver Hills House - alt spelling, Amiskwatchiwwaskahigan)
"Years before white men came to the Edmonton area the Cree Indians had named many of the natural features of the region - rivers, lakes, hills, etc.
When the Hudson’s Bay and North West Companies established Forts Edmonton and Augustus in 1795 - the Crees identified them with the nearby Beaver Hills, the most prominent land marks in the district.
Accordingly, the name Beaver Hills House was given to the Forts by the Cree Indians who lived and hunted in the region in what is now the City of Edmonton.” [image 1 via, image 2 via]

Amiskwaskahegan (Cree name for Beaver Hills House - alt spelling, Amiskwatchiwwaskahigan)

"Years before white men came to the Edmonton area the Cree Indians had named many of the natural features of the region - rivers, lakes, hills, etc.

When the Hudson’s Bay and North West Companies established Forts Edmonton and Augustus in 1795 - the Crees identified them with the nearby Beaver Hills, the most prominent land marks in the district.

Accordingly, the name Beaver Hills House was given to the Forts by the Cree Indians who lived and hunted in the region in what is now the City of Edmonton.” [image 1 via, image 2 via]

Lewis Cardinal…Grade One. High Prairie Public School…circa: a long time ago.”

sacredsocialjustice:

A pipe ceremony to pray for the repatriation of the Manitou Stone was held at the Royal Alberta Museum on March 22, 2013. The ceremony was followed by an information session where invited speakers and community members could share about their thoughts and experiences concerning the stone. 

A brief history about the Manitou Stone:
‪The Manitou Stone is part of a meteorite that fell to earth centuries ago in the Iron Creek area near the Alberta-Saskatchewan border. Consisting mostly of iron, the Stone was taken to the Pakan Mission near Smoky Lake by Methodist minister Rev. George McDougall in the 1860s, then was moved to Lac Ste. Anne. ‬‪In 1886, the Stone headed east to Victoria University in Cobourg, Ontario, followed by Toronto’s Royal Ontario Museum. In the early 70s, Minister Horst Schmidt requested that the Stone be loaned to the Royal Alberta Museum, where it has resided since 1972. It is currently on display as part of the RAM’s Aboriginal gallery.‬ 

‪Today, the Manitou Stone is still considered a very sacred object in Canadian Aboriginal culture, viewed as coming from the Creator and a symbol of protection. ‬Some draw a connection between the removal of the Stone and war between the Cree and Blackfoot Nations, the near-extinction of the buffalo, and the smallpox outbreak which ravaged the population — including two of Rev. George McDougall’s daughters.

This ceremony and information session is of utmost importance because it brought together members of both the Aboriginal community and the United Church in an effort towards healing and reconciliation.

Read more about the Manitou Stone here and here.