Mayor Iveson Proclaims A Year of Reconciliation in Edmonton,

March 28, 2014

On behalf of City Council and all Edmontonians, Mayor Don Iveson proclaimed March 2014 - March 2015 A Year of Reconciliation at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) Alberta National Event this morning. Citing three distinct initiatives he will bring forward as priorities under the City’s Indigenous People’s Strategy, the Mayor committed to strengthening relationships with Aboriginal communities.

The announcement followed the Mayor’s induction as an Honourary Witness by TRC commissioners. 

“As an Honourary Witness, I am responsible to call upon myself and my fellow leaders to be the keepers of history,” said Mayor Iveson. “It is a role I accept with great pride and dedication. The road to reconciliation is long and difficult, but with the right commitments from City Council, I believe we can build positive relationships with Aboriginal communities based on mutual respect and understanding of a shared history.”

The Mayor’s commitments include:

  • Creating an urban Aboriginal youth leadership initiative to increase participation in civic programs and services, fill gaps in current programming and enable youth to explore career opportunities in the public service.

  • Developing an education program for city staff that shares the history of residential schools, their impact on Aboriginal peoples, and opens dialogue on reconciliation in the workplace. 

  • Working with Edmonton’s Aboriginal community to create and support a venue, or venues, to promote the spiritual and cultural practices of all indigenous communities, for cultural reconnection, ceremony and celebration.

Mayor Iveson hopes Edmonton will become a symbol of solidarity with Aboriginal communities to other cities in Canada and encourages other municipalities to explore ways they can participate in the process of reconciliation.

Alex Decoteau nearing the finish line at a Christmas Day race, Edmonton, 1915

"Alexander Wuttunee Decoteau, ( 19 November 1887 – 30 October 1917), was a Cree Canadian track and field athlete who competed in the 1912 Summer Olympics. He was also the first aboriginal police officer in Canada.

Alexander was born on the Red Pheasant Indian Reserve (Saskatchewan). He attended school there and at the Battleford Industrial School. He moved to Edmonton where the CityPolice hired him as a constable in 1909. He made sergeant in 1914. During this period he won most major middle or long distance races in western Canada. In 1912 he finished sixth in the 5000 metres competition.

Alex was killed by a sniper in 1917, during the Second Battle of Passchendaele.

Many of DeCoteau’s accomplishments are included in the Edmonton Sports Hall of Fame, where he was inducted a member in 1967. Also, the Edmonton Police Museum and Archives contains may of his personal and military trophies and awards. In 1985, the Cree performed a ceremony in Edmonton “to bring his spirit home”. Honours were provided by the Red Pheasant Band, the Edmonton Police Service and the Canadian army.” [via]

Memorial March for the Murdered and Missing Women of Edmonton

meltingfeels:

image

6:30 pm
Sacred Heart Church of the First Peoples
10821-96 Street
Please wear red or purple

(via meltingfeels-deactivated2014040)

Tracings of pictographs at Mystic Cave, west of Cayley, Alberta, 1961.
foundmonton:

"Natives Rue The World" in red paint on a statue commemorating the fur trader.
This is could be the best graffiti we ever get to share with you.
Do not read fur trade or even first contact, this is a statue commemorating JUST the fur trader. Likely the most exploitative and destructive ‘profession’ in Canadian history, all while depicting a nameless First Nations person.
"This sculpture commemorating the fur trade is one of the most visible representations of a First Nations person downtown. The artist "just created the Indian," says Lewis Cardinal, rather than honouring an aboriginal leader"
It also needs to be said that this statue sits on land that was taken from First Nations for the use of the Hudson Bay company and the origin of Edmonton.
Edmonton is on stolen land and this statue commemorates that history in the heart of downtown, right by city hall.
Note: We did our best to try and concisely summarize our interpretation of the politics and context around this graffiti along with some links. If you have a correction, more information or an insight into this graffiti please share it in the notes. 
foundmonton:

"Natives Rue The World" in red paint on a statue commemorating the fur trader.
This is could be the best graffiti we ever get to share with you.
Do not read fur trade or even first contact, this is a statue commemorating JUST the fur trader. Likely the most exploitative and destructive ‘profession’ in Canadian history, all while depicting a nameless First Nations person.
"This sculpture commemorating the fur trade is one of the most visible representations of a First Nations person downtown. The artist "just created the Indian," says Lewis Cardinal, rather than honouring an aboriginal leader"
It also needs to be said that this statue sits on land that was taken from First Nations for the use of the Hudson Bay company and the origin of Edmonton.
Edmonton is on stolen land and this statue commemorates that history in the heart of downtown, right by city hall.
Note: We did our best to try and concisely summarize our interpretation of the politics and context around this graffiti along with some links. If you have a correction, more information or an insight into this graffiti please share it in the notes. 

foundmonton:

"Natives Rue The World" in red paint on a statue commemorating the fur trader.

This is could be the best graffiti we ever get to share with you.

Do not read fur trade or even first contact, this is a statue commemorating JUST the fur trader. Likely the most exploitative and destructive ‘profession’ in Canadian history, all while depicting a nameless First Nations person.

"This sculpture commemorating the fur trade is one of the most visible representations of a First Nations person downtown. The artist "just created the Indian," says Lewis Cardinal, rather than honouring an aboriginal leader"

It also needs to be said that this statue sits on land that was taken from First Nations for the use of the Hudson Bay company and the origin of Edmonton.

Edmonton is on stolen land and this statue commemorates that history in the heart of downtown, right by city hall.

Note: We did our best to try and concisely summarize our interpretation of the politics and context around this graffiti along with some links. If you have a correction, more information or an insight into this graffiti please share it in the notes. 

Sampson Beaver’s family, near Morley, AB, 1906.
Sampson Beaver & His Daughter Frances Louise. Stoney Tribe Near Morley, Alberta (between 1906-1911).

Sampson Beaver & His Daughter Frances Louise. Stoney Tribe Near Morley, Alberta (between 1906-1911).

Agatha Garneau, Archange Garneau, Charlotte Garneau, and Placide Poirier, Strathcona, Alberta, 1900 or 1901

Agatha Garneau, Archange Garneau, Charlotte Garneau, and Placide Poirier, Strathcona, Alberta, 1900 or 1901

The resource sector creates economic opportunities and employs tens of thousands of Canadians in high-wage jobs, contributing to a standard of living that is envied around the world and helping fund programs and services Canadians rely on,” Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s spokesman, Jason MacDonald, told QMI Agency.

"Even the lifestyle of a rock star relies, to some degree, on the resources developed by thousands of hard-working Canadians every day," MacDonald noted.

A vocal environmentalist and critic of Canada’s oilsands, Young, a longtime resident of California, partnered with First Nations groups in Alberta for his Honour the Treaties Tour, which includes four shows beginning Sunday in Toronto, then Regina, Winnipeg and Calgary. Proceeds of the sold-out concerts go toward the yet undefined legal actions by the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation to fight the expansion of the Shell-owned Jackpine Mine, 70 kilometres outside Fort McMurray, Alta., approved last month by the feds. In September, Young caused a bit of an uproar in Alberta when he said at a National Farmers Union event in Washington, D.C., “Fort McMurray looks like Hiroshima. ”Fort McMurray is a wasteland,” Young said. “The fuel’s all over, the fumes everywhere – you can smell it when you get to town. The closest place to Fort McMurray that is doing the tar sands work is 25 or 30 miles out of town and you can taste it when you get to Fort McMurray,” he said. “People are sick. People are dying of cancer because of this. All the First Nations people up there are threatened by this.”