foundmonton:

"Natives Rue The World" in red paint on a statue commemorating the fur trader.
This is could be the best graffiti we ever get to share with you.
Do not read fur trade or even first contact, this is a statue commemorating JUST the fur trader. Likely the most exploitative and destructive ‘profession’ in Canadian history, all while depicting a nameless First Nations person.
"This sculpture commemorating the fur trade is one of the most visible representations of a First Nations person downtown. The artist "just created the Indian," says Lewis Cardinal, rather than honouring an aboriginal leader"
It also needs to be said that this statue sits on land that was taken from First Nations for the use of the Hudson Bay company and the origin of Edmonton.
Edmonton is on stolen land and this statue commemorates that history in the heart of downtown, right by city hall.
Note: We did our best to try and concisely summarize our interpretation of the politics and context around this graffiti along with some links. If you have a correction, more information or an insight into this graffiti please share it in the notes. 
foundmonton:

"Natives Rue The World" in red paint on a statue commemorating the fur trader.
This is could be the best graffiti we ever get to share with you.
Do not read fur trade or even first contact, this is a statue commemorating JUST the fur trader. Likely the most exploitative and destructive ‘profession’ in Canadian history, all while depicting a nameless First Nations person.
"This sculpture commemorating the fur trade is one of the most visible representations of a First Nations person downtown. The artist "just created the Indian," says Lewis Cardinal, rather than honouring an aboriginal leader"
It also needs to be said that this statue sits on land that was taken from First Nations for the use of the Hudson Bay company and the origin of Edmonton.
Edmonton is on stolen land and this statue commemorates that history in the heart of downtown, right by city hall.
Note: We did our best to try and concisely summarize our interpretation of the politics and context around this graffiti along with some links. If you have a correction, more information or an insight into this graffiti please share it in the notes. 

foundmonton:

"Natives Rue The World" in red paint on a statue commemorating the fur trader.

This is could be the best graffiti we ever get to share with you.

Do not read fur trade or even first contact, this is a statue commemorating JUST the fur trader. Likely the most exploitative and destructive ‘profession’ in Canadian history, all while depicting a nameless First Nations person.

"This sculpture commemorating the fur trade is one of the most visible representations of a First Nations person downtown. The artist "just created the Indian," says Lewis Cardinal, rather than honouring an aboriginal leader"

It also needs to be said that this statue sits on land that was taken from First Nations for the use of the Hudson Bay company and the origin of Edmonton.

Edmonton is on stolen land and this statue commemorates that history in the heart of downtown, right by city hall.

Note: We did our best to try and concisely summarize our interpretation of the politics and context around this graffiti along with some links. If you have a correction, more information or an insight into this graffiti please share it in the notes. 

Map of Treaty 8 territory: “The region included within Treaty 8 was commonly referred to as Athabasca. It was named after the region’s major waterways — the Athabasca River and Lake Athabasca — and included most of the Provisional District of Athabaska of the old North-West Territories. In today’s terms the treaty lands encompass much of what is now the northern half of Alberta, the northeastern quarter of British Columbia, the northwestern corner of Saskatchewan, and the area south of Hay River and Great Slave Lake in the present-day Northwest Territories.”

Capote from the Native Cultural Arts Museum, Grouard, Alberta

“Alexis Residential School Survivors - 1920’s. (First generation that learned to read and write in English)”

Alexis Residential School Survivors - 1920’s. (First generation that learned to read and write in English)”

"Assisted by Willie Morant, Nick Morant makes a portrait of a Stoney chief [no name provided] at Morley, Alberta. ca.1950.”

"Assisted by Willie Morant, Nick Morant makes a portrait of a Stoney chief [no name provided] at Morley, Alberta. ca.1950.”

Amiskwaskahegan (Cree name for Beaver Hills House - alt spelling, Amiskwatchiwwaskahigan)
"Years before white men came to the Edmonton area the Cree Indians had named many of the natural features of the region - rivers, lakes, hills, etc.
When the Hudson’s Bay and North West Companies established Forts Edmonton and Augustus in 1795 - the Crees identified them with the nearby Beaver Hills, the most prominent land marks in the district.
Accordingly, the name Beaver Hills House was given to the Forts by the Cree Indians who lived and hunted in the region in what is now the City of Edmonton.” [image 1 via, image 2 via] Amiskwaskahegan (Cree name for Beaver Hills House - alt spelling, Amiskwatchiwwaskahigan)
"Years before white men came to the Edmonton area the Cree Indians had named many of the natural features of the region - rivers, lakes, hills, etc.
When the Hudson’s Bay and North West Companies established Forts Edmonton and Augustus in 1795 - the Crees identified them with the nearby Beaver Hills, the most prominent land marks in the district.
Accordingly, the name Beaver Hills House was given to the Forts by the Cree Indians who lived and hunted in the region in what is now the City of Edmonton.” [image 1 via, image 2 via]

Amiskwaskahegan (Cree name for Beaver Hills House - alt spelling, Amiskwatchiwwaskahigan)

"Years before white men came to the Edmonton area the Cree Indians had named many of the natural features of the region - rivers, lakes, hills, etc.

When the Hudson’s Bay and North West Companies established Forts Edmonton and Augustus in 1795 - the Crees identified them with the nearby Beaver Hills, the most prominent land marks in the district.

Accordingly, the name Beaver Hills House was given to the Forts by the Cree Indians who lived and hunted in the region in what is now the City of Edmonton.” [image 1 via, image 2 via]

Canadian library, archives & museum workers call for release of residential school documents

As information and cultural workers we value freedom of information and acknowledge the power of documentary heritage to educate the public and play a role in collective healing. The information contained in residential school records holds the promise of such education and healing and their expedited release is owed to all those living in Canada.”

Sign the petition here: http://www.change.org/en-CA/petitions/cdn-library-archives-museum-workers-call-for-release-of-residential-school-documents

Lewis Cardinal…Grade One. High Prairie Public School…circa: a long time ago.”

“Pat Calihoo discovers 65-year-old pemmican on farm in Stony Plain Indian Reserve,” 1950

Pat Calihoo discovers 65-year-old pemmican on farm in Stony Plain Indian Reserve,” 1950

Boy from the Yukon, no date.

Jason Carter, “Boo Meets Bear” from Who is Boo.

Who Is Boo: The Terrific Tales of One Trickster Rabbit is a children’s book that chronicles a perpetually curious rabbit who is in a continual race around the world with his and along the way, meets many animals. The title character is inspired by Nanabozho, a trickster figure in Ojibwe mythology, but the story itself is inspired from the trickster characters prevalent in all ethnicities.”

resistkxl:

Tar Sands Healing Walk 2013 (by fiercelightfilms)

The 4th Annual walk is happening July 5-6, 2013 in Fort McMurray, Alberta