droppedglovesandforgottenloves:

It’s on it’s way :)

sirmitchell:

beatonna:

Here is a sketch comic I made called Ducks, in five parts.

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four

Part Five

Ducks is about part of my time working at a mining site in Fort McMurray, the events are from 2008.  It is a complicated place, it is not the same for all, and these are only my own experiences there.  It is a sketch because I want to test how I would tell these stories, and how I feel about sharing them.  A larger work gets talked about from time to time.  It is not a place I could describe in one or two stories.  Ducks is about a lot of things, and among these, it is about environmental destruction in an environment that includes humans.  Thank you for taking the time to read it.

-Kate

Read it, do it, make it happen. 

Oil Sands Karaoke: “Home to one of the most controversial industries in the world—the Athabasca tar sands—Fort McMurray, Alberta, has seen a record population boom. Thousands of men and women from as far away as PEI and Labrador and as close by as local aboriginal communities, have flocked to the city to work in the oil patch, all attracted by the promise of good jobs and a high salary. The work is hard and the hours are long. The weather is harsh and the social life is sparse, and everyone must cope with the knowledge that many people worldwide—possibly even friends and family—object, sometimes strenuously, to what they do for a living. How do they cope? With karaoke of course! Oil Sands Karaoke profiles five Fort McMurray residents as they prepare to unleash their inner divas at Bailey’s, the local pub, in a vocal battle royal.” [via]

The resource sector creates economic opportunities and employs tens of thousands of Canadians in high-wage jobs, contributing to a standard of living that is envied around the world and helping fund programs and services Canadians rely on,” Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s spokesman, Jason MacDonald, told QMI Agency.

"Even the lifestyle of a rock star relies, to some degree, on the resources developed by thousands of hard-working Canadians every day," MacDonald noted.

A vocal environmentalist and critic of Canada’s oilsands, Young, a longtime resident of California, partnered with First Nations groups in Alberta for his Honour the Treaties Tour, which includes four shows beginning Sunday in Toronto, then Regina, Winnipeg and Calgary. Proceeds of the sold-out concerts go toward the yet undefined legal actions by the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation to fight the expansion of the Shell-owned Jackpine Mine, 70 kilometres outside Fort McMurray, Alta., approved last month by the feds. In September, Young caused a bit of an uproar in Alberta when he said at a National Farmers Union event in Washington, D.C., “Fort McMurray looks like Hiroshima. ”Fort McMurray is a wasteland,” Young said. “The fuel’s all over, the fumes everywhere – you can smell it when you get to town. The closest place to Fort McMurray that is doing the tar sands work is 25 or 30 miles out of town and you can taste it when you get to Fort McMurray,” he said. “People are sick. People are dying of cancer because of this. All the First Nations people up there are threatened by this.”

(via resistkxl)

from the CAPSE zine, “FIGHT BACK: a response to Alberta’s cuts to post-secondary education”

from the CAPSE zine, “FIGHT BACK: a response to Alberta’s cuts to post-secondary education”

“If you look at something for too long, it becomes invisible. Your eyes need a little shake, saccade, to wake them up, so you can see what’s right in front of you. A bit of blur, some judder, to make it all come into focus.
When I say give your head a shake, that’s what I mean.
There. See it now?”
from “Tarhands: A Messy Manifesto" by Warren Cariou “If you look at something for too long, it becomes invisible. Your eyes need a little shake, saccade, to wake them up, so you can see what’s right in front of you. A bit of blur, some judder, to make it all come into focus.
When I say give your head a shake, that’s what I mean.
There. See it now?”
from “Tarhands: A Messy Manifesto" by Warren Cariou “If you look at something for too long, it becomes invisible. Your eyes need a little shake, saccade, to wake them up, so you can see what’s right in front of you. A bit of blur, some judder, to make it all come into focus.
When I say give your head a shake, that’s what I mean.
There. See it now?”
from “Tarhands: A Messy Manifesto" by Warren Cariou “If you look at something for too long, it becomes invisible. Your eyes need a little shake, saccade, to wake them up, so you can see what’s right in front of you. A bit of blur, some judder, to make it all come into focus.
When I say give your head a shake, that’s what I mean.
There. See it now?”
from “Tarhands: A Messy Manifesto" by Warren Cariou

If you look at something for too long, it becomes invisible. Your eyes need a little shake, saccade, to wake them up, so you can see what’s right in front of you. A bit of blur, some judder, to make it all come into focus.

When I say give your head a shake, that’s what I mean.

There. See it now?”

from “Tarhands: A Messy Manifesto" by Warren Cariou

canadian-communist:

Canada has the third largest proven oil reserves in the world, but the province of Alberta is planning to cut education and health care spending this year, and Canada’s national debt stands at a whopping $600 billion (CAD). 

How can that be? With so many people calling our massive tar sands reserves the “Saudi Arabia of the North,” how can we be so cash-strapped? How can the Alberta government be planning to cut funding to schools, education and health care if the province is so oil rich? 

The best answer can be found in Norway, which this year alone will enjoy a $44 billion budget surplus. The country has the 22nd largest proven oil reserves in the world and about 40-percent less oil is produced by that country, compared to Canada. 

On top of massive government budget surpluses, Norway also has no foreign debt, and $634 billion set aside as a public savings fund. This fund, called the Government Sovereign Wealth fund - set up to collect oil and gas revenues - is projected to be worth $1 trillion by 2020 and currently holds more than 1-percent of all the world’s equity. 

To put it simply, Norway is rolling in the dough and their number one sector is oil and gas exploration, production and export.

There are many differences between Norway and Canada that can explain why Norway is so rich and Canada so relatively poor, but there is one huge difference that stands out amongst the rest: oil royalties. Royalties are the amount a government charges oil companies for being allowed to extract and sell the country’s oil.

Norway charges oil companies about 70-percent of their profits for the right to extract and sell Norway’s oil. So for every dollar a company like ExxonMobil or British Petroleum makes in profit in Norway, about 70-cents of that dollar goes to the government and back to the people of Norway. 

A director of the Norwegian Ministry of Oil & Energy, Matte Agerup, summed up Norway’s philosophy on their oil reserves best when she explained that, ”the state [Norway] operated on the basis that the oil company was the helper in harnessing the country’s natural resources, but that the oil ultimately belongs to the nation.”

The Canadian government does not charge a royalty on the profits of oil companies operating in the Alberta tar sands, only the Alberta provincial government does. In 2009, the Alberta government collected more in gambling and casino revenue than it did in royalties from oil companies.

In recent years, the Alberta government has been collecting roughly a five to ten-percent royalty from oil companies operating in the tar sands (the calculations, as you can imagine, are complicated, but this appears a safe estimate). Author and tar sands expert, Andrew Nikiforuk, writing in the Tyee, provides a much more in-depth look at the numbers if you’re interested. 

Suffice it to say, Canadians are not getting the returns they deserve for the risks they are inheriting. Companies like ExxonMobil, who last year made an estimated $104 million a day from global operations, get to extract oil from Canada’s tar sands and sell it off to foreign interests, while Canadians get little more than the resulting climate change pollution and massive toxic lakes of sludge that seep into our freshwater reserves. 

Great deal if you’re ExxonMobil. Bum deal for Canadians. But the answer seems pretty simple - charge the oil companies way more for the right to extract and sell our country’s oil. Politicians, of course, will tell you it’s much more complicated than that. 

But trust me, it isn’t. Norway did it and the oil companies are still there. And, in fact, they are investing more than ever.

Source

Next read: Misplaced Generosity Update 2012: Extraordinary profits in Alberta’s oil and gas industry by David Campanella
“Alberta’s oil and gas industry continues to rake in billions of dollars’ worth of profits while the provincial government continues to run deficits and underfund education and health care services in the province. The diverging fortunes of the province and the oilpatch are clearly evident from the contrast between the government’s ongoing revenue crisis, which has resulted in a $3 billion deficit, and the growing profits being reported by the oil industry. Suncor, Canada’s largest oil and gas company, reported yearly profits of $4.3 billion, while Imperial Oil, which is 70% owned by U.S.-based ExxonMobil, made profits last fiscal year of $3.37 billion, the second largest in its record.”

Next read: Misplaced Generosity Update 2012: Extraordinary profits in Alberta’s oil and gas industry by David Campanella

Alberta’s oil and gas industry continues to rake in billions of dollars’ worth of profits while the provincial government continues to run deficits and underfund education and health care services in the province. The diverging fortunes of the province and the oilpatch are clearly evident from the contrast between the government’s ongoing revenue crisis, which has resulted in a $3 billion deficit, and the growing profits being reported by the oil industry. Suncor, Canada’s largest oil and gas company, reported yearly profits of $4.3 billion, while Imperial Oil, which is 70% owned by U.S.-based ExxonMobil, made profits last fiscal year of $3.37 billion, the second largest in its record.”

resistkxl:

Tell the federal government that your health is a priority and that polluters must be held accountable for what they put into the air, water and land you depend on.

Tell the federal government to investigate and disclose the full impacts of oilsands pollution today.

We want thousands of Canadians to co-sign the letter. Will you?

resistkxl:

Vice Magazine’s Toxic Alberta, Part 1

Make your way to Vice’s website to watch all three parts- from the chilling lack of knowledge displayed by Ralph Klein, to Oilsands officials considering themselves ‘environmentalists’, to a small community of Native people made homeless and starving by Fort McMurray’s oil boom.

Images from “Imagining the Tar Sands 1880-1967 and Beyond,” Mike Gismondi and Debra J. Davidson
Abstract: “For much of the history of Alberta’s tar sands, a series of visual conventions have shaped Canadian imaginaries of the resource, the emergence of the non-conventional oil industry, and the mining of oil. We introduce a series of archival images dating from 1880 until the opening of Great Canadian Oil Sands (Suncor) in 1967, to analyze how visual representations were used to justify government and public support for bitumen mining and refining, to legitimate state research into the separation of oil from the sands, and to ideologically sustain public funding of the development of this unique Canadian resource industry. We conclude that many elements of these early positive normative conceptual frameworks remain in play today, used by corporate and government meaning–makers to blunt contemporary critiques by the public of social and ecological tradeoffs, and ultimately to legitimate Alberta and Canada’s pursuit of non-conventional oil as an acceptable energy future.”
Experimental Pavement Laid with Alberta Bituminous Sand under Direction of Mines Branch 1930, Alberta Tar Sands Grand Trunk Pacific Rail Car 1924, Canada Post Corporation Athabasca Tar Sands Stamp, 1978, Geological Survey of Canada; Tar Sands Athabasca River, Alta 1892,  Dr. Sidney Ells at Fort McMurray Tar Sands, 1928 Images from “Imagining the Tar Sands 1880-1967 and Beyond,” Mike Gismondi and Debra J. Davidson
Abstract: “For much of the history of Alberta’s tar sands, a series of visual conventions have shaped Canadian imaginaries of the resource, the emergence of the non-conventional oil industry, and the mining of oil. We introduce a series of archival images dating from 1880 until the opening of Great Canadian Oil Sands (Suncor) in 1967, to analyze how visual representations were used to justify government and public support for bitumen mining and refining, to legitimate state research into the separation of oil from the sands, and to ideologically sustain public funding of the development of this unique Canadian resource industry. We conclude that many elements of these early positive normative conceptual frameworks remain in play today, used by corporate and government meaning–makers to blunt contemporary critiques by the public of social and ecological tradeoffs, and ultimately to legitimate Alberta and Canada’s pursuit of non-conventional oil as an acceptable energy future.”
Experimental Pavement Laid with Alberta Bituminous Sand under Direction of Mines Branch 1930, Alberta Tar Sands Grand Trunk Pacific Rail Car 1924, Canada Post Corporation Athabasca Tar Sands Stamp, 1978, Geological Survey of Canada; Tar Sands Athabasca River, Alta 1892,  Dr. Sidney Ells at Fort McMurray Tar Sands, 1928 Images from “Imagining the Tar Sands 1880-1967 and Beyond,” Mike Gismondi and Debra J. Davidson
Abstract: “For much of the history of Alberta’s tar sands, a series of visual conventions have shaped Canadian imaginaries of the resource, the emergence of the non-conventional oil industry, and the mining of oil. We introduce a series of archival images dating from 1880 until the opening of Great Canadian Oil Sands (Suncor) in 1967, to analyze how visual representations were used to justify government and public support for bitumen mining and refining, to legitimate state research into the separation of oil from the sands, and to ideologically sustain public funding of the development of this unique Canadian resource industry. We conclude that many elements of these early positive normative conceptual frameworks remain in play today, used by corporate and government meaning–makers to blunt contemporary critiques by the public of social and ecological tradeoffs, and ultimately to legitimate Alberta and Canada’s pursuit of non-conventional oil as an acceptable energy future.”
Experimental Pavement Laid with Alberta Bituminous Sand under Direction of Mines Branch 1930, Alberta Tar Sands Grand Trunk Pacific Rail Car 1924, Canada Post Corporation Athabasca Tar Sands Stamp, 1978, Geological Survey of Canada; Tar Sands Athabasca River, Alta 1892,  Dr. Sidney Ells at Fort McMurray Tar Sands, 1928 Images from “Imagining the Tar Sands 1880-1967 and Beyond,” Mike Gismondi and Debra J. Davidson
Abstract: “For much of the history of Alberta’s tar sands, a series of visual conventions have shaped Canadian imaginaries of the resource, the emergence of the non-conventional oil industry, and the mining of oil. We introduce a series of archival images dating from 1880 until the opening of Great Canadian Oil Sands (Suncor) in 1967, to analyze how visual representations were used to justify government and public support for bitumen mining and refining, to legitimate state research into the separation of oil from the sands, and to ideologically sustain public funding of the development of this unique Canadian resource industry. We conclude that many elements of these early positive normative conceptual frameworks remain in play today, used by corporate and government meaning–makers to blunt contemporary critiques by the public of social and ecological tradeoffs, and ultimately to legitimate Alberta and Canada’s pursuit of non-conventional oil as an acceptable energy future.”
Experimental Pavement Laid with Alberta Bituminous Sand under Direction of Mines Branch 1930, Alberta Tar Sands Grand Trunk Pacific Rail Car 1924, Canada Post Corporation Athabasca Tar Sands Stamp, 1978, Geological Survey of Canada; Tar Sands Athabasca River, Alta 1892,  Dr. Sidney Ells at Fort McMurray Tar Sands, 1928 Images from “Imagining the Tar Sands 1880-1967 and Beyond,” Mike Gismondi and Debra J. Davidson
Abstract: “For much of the history of Alberta’s tar sands, a series of visual conventions have shaped Canadian imaginaries of the resource, the emergence of the non-conventional oil industry, and the mining of oil. We introduce a series of archival images dating from 1880 until the opening of Great Canadian Oil Sands (Suncor) in 1967, to analyze how visual representations were used to justify government and public support for bitumen mining and refining, to legitimate state research into the separation of oil from the sands, and to ideologically sustain public funding of the development of this unique Canadian resource industry. We conclude that many elements of these early positive normative conceptual frameworks remain in play today, used by corporate and government meaning–makers to blunt contemporary critiques by the public of social and ecological tradeoffs, and ultimately to legitimate Alberta and Canada’s pursuit of non-conventional oil as an acceptable energy future.”
Experimental Pavement Laid with Alberta Bituminous Sand under Direction of Mines Branch 1930, Alberta Tar Sands Grand Trunk Pacific Rail Car 1924, Canada Post Corporation Athabasca Tar Sands Stamp, 1978, Geological Survey of Canada; Tar Sands Athabasca River, Alta 1892,  Dr. Sidney Ells at Fort McMurray Tar Sands, 1928

Images from “Imagining the Tar Sands 1880-1967 and Beyond,” Mike Gismondi and Debra J. Davidson

Abstract: “For much of the history of Alberta’s tar sands, a series of visual conventions have shaped Canadian imaginaries of the resource, the emergence of the non-conventional oil industry, and the mining of oil. We introduce a series of archival images dating from 1880 until the opening of Great Canadian Oil Sands (Suncor) in 1967, to analyze how visual representations were used to justify government and public support for bitumen mining and refining, to legitimate state research into the separation of oil from the sands, and to ideologically sustain public funding of the development of this unique Canadian resource industry. We conclude that many elements of these early positive normative conceptual frameworks remain in play today, used by corporate and government meaning–makers to blunt contemporary critiques by the public of social and ecological tradeoffs, and ultimately to legitimate Alberta and Canada’s pursuit of non-conventional oil as an acceptable energy future.”

Experimental Pavement Laid with Alberta Bituminous Sand under Direction of Mines Branch 1930, Alberta Tar Sands Grand Trunk Pacific Rail Car 1924, Canada Post Corporation Athabasca Tar Sands Stamp, 1978, Geological Survey of Canada; Tar Sands Athabasca River, Alta 1892,  Dr. Sidney Ells at Fort McMurray Tar Sands, 1928