365canadiandays:

July 23, 1914 – The Komagata Maru, chartered by Gurdit Singh Komagata Maru, is escorted out of Vancouver with 376 passengers. Vancouver, British Columbia.

The Komagata Maru steamed into Vancouver in May 1914. Its passengers, mostly Sikhs from Punjab, India and all British subjects, challenged Canada’s Continuous Journey clause, which was put in place in part to limit immigration from non-European countries. After two months under difficult conditions, the ship and most of its passengers were forced to return to India where, in a subsequent clash with British soldiers, 19 passengers died.” (via)

tenacious-z:

So I was just taking the bus home when I saw this. Why are they even advertising in Canada when it is clearly labelled the “American Freedom Defense Initiative”? Also, “Is there a fatwa on your head?” The ignorance is astounding. HONOR KILLINGS HAVE NO BASIS IN ISLAM! Anyone who uses Islam to justify an “honour killing” is WRONG. 

ETS is taking them down - see the Journal article, Edmonton Transit Removing ‘Racist’ Honour Killing Ad

black-culture:

Watch Martin Bashir Sum Up The Trayvon Martin Travesty In Under 4 Minutes

(via treetreeshorts)

“Children playing on merry-go-round, Edmonton Indian Residential School, c. 1950”

The K and P Cafe in Lethbridge, Alberta (no date, from the April “Chop Suey in the Prairies” exhibit at the Royal Alberta Museum).

Dotted across the Alberta landscape, Chinese restaurants were the go-to place for an inexpensive, quick meal whether it was a simple plate of fried onion rings or the more exotic ginger beef and mu shu pork. In looking back, the growth of Chinese cafés gradually laid a foundation as important cultural icons. But they never started out as cultural entities.

They were born out of necessity, a desperate need for a minority to find financial security in an era oozing racism. The original Chinese coffee shops were started as efficiently run businesses that provided a living and financial security to an otherwise marginalized ethnic population.”

zombies-ate-her-brain:

Residential School mural? #yeg #edmonton #trains (at Grandin/Government Centre LRT Station)

You can read all about the controversy surrounding this hideous and deeply troubling mural here (and yes, that’s Bishop Grandin, a nun holding an aboriginal child, a residential school in the background, and an aboriginal family being led away from their child and towards a train station). 

“Stephen Harper was a member of the ultra-right-wing Northern Foundation in 1989, … a group that had numerous Neo-Nazi skinheads as organizers, as well as a leadership that included a well-known white supremacist and anti-feminist crusader as a prominent leader that sought to take over the mass-media to enable the fulfillment of a right wing agenda.”

In 1928, the Legislative Assembly of Alberta, Canada, enacted the Sexual Sterilization Act. The Act, drafted to protect the gene pool, allowed for sterilization of mentally disabled persons in order to prevent the transmission of undesirable traits to offspring. At that time, eugenicists argued that mental illnessmental retardationepilepsyalcoholism, pauperism, certain criminal behaviours, and social defects, such as prostitution and sexual perversion, were genetically determined and inherited. Further, it was widely believed that persons with these disorders had a higher reproduction rate than the normal population. As a result, it was feared the gene pool in the general population was weakening.

During the time the Alberta Sexual Sterilization Act was in effect, 4,725 cases were proposed for sterilization in the Province of Alberta, of which over 2,800 received approval. Examination of sterilization records demonstrates that legislation did not apply equally to all members of society. Specifically, the Act was disproportionately applied to those in socially vulnerable positions, including: females, children, unemployed persons, domestics, rural citizens, unmarried, institutionalized persons, Roman and Greek Catholics, persons of UkrainianNative and Métis ethnicity.”

The act was finally repealed in 1972. (image via.)

callthisdemocracy:

This is not okay.
This stereotypes ancient and beautiful cultures.
This exploits cultural identity as a capitalist tool.
This indoctrinates racism in the minds of our children.

This is not okay.

gwatej:

We Were Children - Trailer (APTN and TRC)

The film is available to rent, download or buy the dvd here.

(via sikssaapo-p)

The Edmonton protest march against  W5, January 26,1980.
“On September 30, 1979, the CTV television network’s W5 public affairs program aired a segment called “Campus Giveaway” which was to become the focus of political activity that would shake the Chinese community for the next two years…“Campus Giveaway” portrayed the Chinese as alien, inassimilable, insular, and competitive. As the camera panned across the faces of students of Chinese ancestry, the show charged that 100,000 foreign students had descended on Canada’s campuses, squeezing white Canadian students out of places in the professional schools.
CTV’s message was plain – the Chinese were foreigners regardless of their birthplace. Reminiscent of the chargers against early Chinese labourers, the students were accused of coming to Canada to milk the country of its wealth and resources. After using Canada’s educational facilities, these “foreigners” would flee to China and Hong Kong with professional degrees financed by the Canadian taxpayer. The Chinese were yet again pictured as transient, as exploiter, as sojourner.”

The Edmonton protest march against  W5, January 26,1980.

On September 30, 1979, the CTV television network’s W5 public affairs program aired a segment called “Campus Giveaway” which was to become the focus of political activity that would shake the Chinese community for the next two years…“Campus Giveaway” portrayed the Chinese as alien, inassimilable, insular, and competitive. As the camera panned across the faces of students of Chinese ancestry, the show charged that 100,000 foreign students had descended on Canada’s campuses, squeezing white Canadian students out of places in the professional schools.

CTV’s message was plain – the Chinese were foreigners regardless of their birthplace. Reminiscent of the chargers against early Chinese labourers, the students were accused of coming to Canada to milk the country of its wealth and resources. After using Canada’s educational facilities, these “foreigners” would flee to China and Hong Kong with professional degrees financed by the Canadian taxpayer. The Chinese were yet again pictured as transient, as exploiter, as sojourner.”

April 10, 1912